Mayor and Mayoress of Maghull represent the town at historic sta

Mayor and Mayoress of Maghull Cllrs Steve and Gwen Kermode and descendents of Kitty Wilkinson Dorothy Philips and Marion Wright with the newly unveiled statue.

 

Maghull was represented at a historic statue unveiling commemorating a Liverpool heroine, by Mayor and Mayoress of Maghull Cllrs Steve and Gwen Kermode.

The Mayor and Mayoress attended the special ceremony at St George's Hall where the statue of Kitty Wilkinson was unveiled.

Kitty Wilkinson was the pioneer of the wash-house whose efforts led to improvements in hygiene and the advancement of health care in Liverpool.

It is the first time in over 100 years that a sculpture has been commissioned at St George's.

Mayoress Cllr Gwen Kermode said the statue was a fitting tribute to a pioneer of public health.

Cllr Kermode said: "Kitty Wilkinson was a pioneer in Liverpool who led the way in public hygiene and who has subsequently saved hundreds of thousands of lives.

"She came across to Liverpool from Ireland in the 18th Century. After working as a servant and then as an impoverished servant she married a French sailor with whom she had two sons. After the death of her husband, she spent years surviving on charity from her parish and by charring and nail-making.

"After remarrying, Kitty then took on and cared for many destitute children. But it's her role during the cholera outbreak in 1832 for which she is best remembered.

"She cared for orphan children for whom she set up a school and with a total disregard for her own safety she cared fore the sick in her own home which she turned into a wash house.

Mayor and Mayoress of Maghull Cllrs Steve and Gwen Kermode and descendents of Kitty Wilkinson Dorothy Philips and Marion Wright with the newly unveiled statue."Following the advice of a surgeon she taught that cleanliness was the main weapon against disease by allowing her neighbours to wash and disinfect their bedding in her kitchen.

"Kitty's work was recognised and she and her husband were appointed the superintendents of the newly established Public Baths and Wash House in 1842.

"It is fitting that Kitty is remembered for her work with the poor in the city and I was honoured to represent Maghull at the historic unveiling."

Mayor Cllr Steve Kermode said Kitty Wilkinson was rightly considered a heroine in Liverpool.

Cllr Kermode said: "St George's Hall is one of the finest buildings in region, so it is a suitable location for a woman who made such a major impact on the lives of ordinary people in and around Liverpool.

"It was also an honour to meet some of the surviving descendants of Kitty's at the unveiling ceremony."